DEA realizes what we've known all along, marijuana is not a gateway drug

DEA realizes what we've known all along, marijuana is not a gateway drug

VicesFebruary 16, 2017 By Reilly Capps

The DEA — also known as America's Hall Monitor — just dropped some of the Scared Straight language from its website.

A URL that once held the pdf called "Dangers and Consequences of Marijuana" is now glaringly empty. It used to say that cannabis is a gateway drug, wrecks your brain, makes you go crazy and gives you lung cancer. All of that noise … bye. 

How did this happen? You'll be shocked to grok that there's a law on the books called the Information Quality Act that states the government has to give quality information with "objectivity, utility and integrity." If they don't, anyone can file a motion to make them change the information provided. This is what Americans for Safe Access (ASA), a medical marijuana advocacy group, did. And sayonara, alternative facts! 

Good start, the ASA says — but not good enough.

“The DEA continues to disseminate many damaging facts about the health risks of medical cannabis," said Vickie Feeman in a press release. "We are hopeful the DEA will also remove the remaining statements rather than continue to mislead the public in the face of the scientifically proven benefits of medical cannabis.”

The DEA said it won't comment on the matter, citing pending litigation.

There's still a lot of unbelievable bullshit masquerading as marijuana information on the DEA's website, however, including various press releases that still refer to marijuana as an "addictive and dangerous gateway drug" and web pages that still claim "there's no evidence that smoking marijuana helps" anything, when everyone knows that marijuana vastly improves Rick and Morty. 

Not to mention the site blathers on with compostable blah blah about other drugs that is neither quality nor objective nor information, like eating mushrooms is similar to "playing Russian roulette" or that mushroom overdoses can kill you.

Nah, bruh.

Recently, the DEA backed down on scheduling Kratom, and it hasn't stopped states from legalizing pot yet either. It's becoming increasingly clear: the War on Drugs continues to be won by the drugs.